Yet Half Are Unaware They Are Infected

Yet Half Are Unaware They Are Infected

(NAPSI) In 2001, William Yarbrough was looking forward to his future. He decided to visit his doctor to find out why he was feeling constantly fatigued and was shocked when the results of a simple blood test showed he was infected with chronic hepatitis C (HCV). Like so many others diagnosed with this potentially life threatening liver disease, William was blind sided; he wanted to see his children grow old.

Stories like William’s aren’t uncommon because HCV is highly infectious and the most prevalent chronic blood borne infection in the United States, cheap nfl jerseysaffecting nearly 3.5 million Americans. Baby boomers born between 1945 and 1965 account for 81 percent of adults with this virus. HCV can be spread via contaminated needles from tattoos, needle sticks or intravenous drug use. Before widespread screening of the blood supply in 1992, the virus was often spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants.

After his diagnosis with HCV in 2001, William enrolled in several clinical trials in an attempt to treat his disease yet nothing worked. Now, thanks to recent scientific advances, highly effective treatment options are available. These advances are especially important for African Americans, who experienced lower treatment response rates with previous therapies. The newer treatments are able to cure the disease in more than 90 percent of patients meaning the virus is undetectable in the blood when checked three months or more after treatment is completed. Treatment success rates are now just as high in African Americans as they are in other demographics.

 

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